15 Aug

A-level top grades rise in Northern Ireland

A-level top grades rise in Northern IrelandThere has been a rise in the proportion of top A-level grades awarded to pupils in Northern Ireland.

About 28,000 students received their A-level and AS-level results on Thursday morning.

Just over 30% of entries were awarded A* or A grades, a rise of half a per cent on 2018.

In a further change from last year, a higher number of entries from girls than boys achieved the top A* grade.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-49351481

14 Aug

Northern Ireland schools funding rise hit by pension costs

Northern Ireland schools funding rise hit by pension costsA funding rise for schools in Northern Ireland will be almost entirely spent on increased teacher pension costs.

The Department of Education has increased the money schools get per pupil by more than 5% in 2019-20.

However, schools have had to pay a 7.4% increase in employer pension contributions since 1 April.

The amount of funding per pupil for 2019-20 has just been published by the department.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-49341671

14 Aug

Hundreds of `future leaders’ take part in US-inspired summer camp

Hundreds of `future leaders' take part in US-inspired summer campYoung people from all beliefs and backgrounds have been taking part in a US-style summer camp.

Camp Camilla at Lagan College welcomed more than 200 pupils.

The idea grew out of the vision and dedication of a small group of people in both Texas and Northern Ireland.

The week-long event aims to build an environment where young people will broaden their experiences and grow in confidence.

It is hoped that this will help them on their journey towards becoming future leaders.

Open to young people ages 10-14, it provides for participants to explore and advance in sports, both visual and performance arts, science and technology.

http://www.irishnews.com/news/educationnews/2019/08/14/news/hundreds-of-future-leaders-take-part-in-us-inspired-summer-camp-1683136/

13 Aug

Shared housing and integrated education: Building good community relations, report via Slugger O’Toole

Shared housing and integrated education: Building good community relationsA panel discussion on how shared housing projects and the integrated education movement are contributing towards good community relations was held at St Mary’s College, Belfast, as part of the Feile Festival. The panellists were Deborah Howe (Equality Commission), Christine Davis (Housing Executive), Grainne Mullin (Radius Housing), and Jill Caskey (Integrated Education Fund). The event was chaired by Gerry McConville.

After a welcome by Jessica Blomkvist (Community Outreach Officer, Integrated Education Fund (IEF)), Gerry McConville introduced the panellists and made a general remark that planning for social housing must be based on the needs of the applicants and not on the personal greed of any politician or property developer.

https://sluggerotoole.com/2019/08/13/shared-housing-and-integrated-education-building-good-community-relations/

9 Aug

Segregated education, letter to Irish Times

It is undeniable that segregated education has helped maintain the divide in IrelandSir, – Separating our children into different schools based on religion means that they never get to know and become friends with those from the other community. This leaves them vulnerable to sectarian stereotyping and fear of the other.

It is undeniable that segregated education has helped maintain the divide in Ireland.

It is not the teaching of religion in schools which is the fundamental problem, it is the separation of our children into what amounts to separate cultures which amplifies the differences and perpetuated division.

https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/letters/segregated-education-1.3980851

9 Aug

Integrated education, letter to Irish Times

Any society moving forward from conflict has no choice but to address the separations that exist between its peoplSir, – In 2009, Northern Ireland was warned by the report of its Consultative Group on the Past (“Eames-Bradley”) that: “Any society moving forward from conflict has no choice but to address the separations that exist between its people . . . Specifically the arguments about the ethos or quality of education provided in the faith-based sectors have to be balanced against the reality that reconciliation may never be achieved if our children continue to attend separated schools”.

From the membership of that consultative group, we can see that it was clearly not anti-church or anti-faith.

Ireland as a whole is now approaching the 188th anniversary of the “Stanley Letter” of autumn 1831 which created the national school system.

It was specifically designed to be cross-community in structure – non-denominational, but with facilities for clergy to visit and instruct the children of their own flock.

https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/letters/integrated-education-1.3979726?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter


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